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Monogram 1/48 F-84F Thunderstreak

March 20, 2013 in Aviation

Another one of those old Monogram kits you can pick up at a show for a few dollars. Development began by Rebublic slapping some swept wings on an F-84E but then they completely redesigned it around the J-65 engine and the Thunderstreak took to the air in 1952. Used as escorts for B-36 bombers, flown by the Tactical Air Commad, NATO nations and lots of Air Guard units this bird flew until 1971 when they were finally scrapped due to corrosion problems. Built OOB, with Tamiya rattle can paint and Squadron decals and finished with Future because the Air Guard units seemed to always have nice bright clean jets. No putty as the fit was great and the cockpit was really nice as well. Thought it looked best closed and of course I couldn’t help but do the iron bombs. Interesting fact is this bird could carry a tactical nuclear weapon and pilots trained in how to toss it at a target.

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7 responses to Monogram 1/48 F-84F Thunderstreak

  1. Very cool…. These ancient Monogram kits are a great testament to old technology. Kinda like some of the marvelous vinyl LPs from back in the day…. e.g. Heart- Dreamboat Annie & Supertramp- Crime of the Century. Most excellent shiny gas passer!

  2. Although it went to reserve units almost immediately, NATO got quite a few of them, and two wings of reserve/guard 84F’s were alerted for the “Berlin Crisis” in ’61. They used to practice the ‘loft manuver’ where Russki/DDR radar could see them, as a bit of ‘psywar’, the loft was how the 84’s would deliver a nuke. The last 84’s were painted in the SE Asia camo scheme (at least the ones I saw were).

  3. This is one of those kits that can be done very nicely (as here) with just a bit of effort. The finish is just right since these airplanes were painted aluminum lacquer for corrosion control.

    Get hold of “A Stranger To The Ground,” Richard Bach’s first book – the story of a night flight from England to France through a thunderstorm in an F-84F during the Berlin Crisis. This is the book that got him compared to St. Exupery, and it definitely can be compared to “Wind, Sand and Stars” or “Night Flight.”

  4. “Very cool…. These ancient Monogram kits are a great testament to old technology. Kinda like some of the marvelous vinyl LPs from back in the day…. e.g. Heart- Dreamboat Annie & Supertramp- Crime of the Century.”

    In my opinion you can’t beat “Vinyl” …records have a warmer cleaner and more down to earth sound than anything digital. People pay good money for sound systems with “tubes” and turntables these days.

    With regards to tactical Nukes, they where one-way missions for the pilot.

    The model looks great and the engineering leans more towards art than raw data.

    Two thumbs up

  5. Very nice Tom – great finish from the rattle can!

  6. tom, nice job and note: all of the F-84 family, “Plank” wing and the swept wing “F” used in the USAF active service were all naturlal metal finish, when exported and turned over to National Guard / Reserve units we seen some Paint on all versions mostly exported versions and thenl they were used in the SEA in the Camo versions for a short while. I was there seen many of those during the 1950s. the pilots hated them, no redunant back up systems, and if the angle of attach was wrong on take off it tended to head for the corn field with the nose still up, and grab the safty net and pull the anchor chain at the end of the runway. BTW, the older Monogram kits are as good as most of the newer kits, just take more time and skill and if you want a certain type of toy airplane, they are still the only way to go. Yours could sit anywhere and would put most to shame on the table,

  7. Great job Tom! One of my favorite 50s jets, and a favorite Monogram kit as well. I did one in the three color camo last year (it can be seen several pages back now). These are really nice aircraft kits and can produce very fine models as yours certainly proves. Congrats on a great finish!

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