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Wingnut Wings 1:32 Sopwith Snipe Early.

March 20, 2014 in Aviation

Hello, this is my fourth Wingnut’s model. It is a pleasure to build, but it takes a lot of time and patience,
Painted with Gunze acrylics and chipped with the hair spray technique. The wood graining was achieved with acrylic paint applied with a broad brush and rigging was made from Radu Brinzan’s RFC flat wiring.
Hope you like it!

Best regards:


20 additional images. Click to enlarge

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27 responses to Wingnut Wings 1:32 Sopwith Snipe Early.

  1. Absolutely beautiful work Emeterio,
    Simply breathtaking modelling at its best
    one question i would like to know what colour you used on the top surface of the wings to do the PC10 it looks very brown ?

    • The Snipe was painted overall PC.12 more brown. While the model is really nice, I am at a bit of a loss about the two colors, since it constructed from sub-assemblies from different contractors. That said, the weathering is quite nice. Looks like an airplane that might have been involved in the Russian Intervention, or the Turkey Intervention after the war.

  2. Thank you very much Mark for your kind words. Actually, the wings on this model were PC 12, while the fuselage was repainted on PC 10.
    Best regards:


    • AH, PC12 id really like to know what you mixed for the PC colours because they look spot on i have seen some of the preserved WW1 aircraft in the Shuttlworth collection in the UK and one of them the SE5a or it could be the Bristol Fighter, it is definitely more a brown colour than green, i have some of the Misterkit WW1 colours including the two PC Dope colours and they are very opaque when sprayed so i would really like to know what you used.
      thanks Emeterio

      • Also, Mark, while there was an official specification for P.C.10, it was not followed that closely by all the contractors. You can do anything from Chocolate Brown to RAF Dark Green (which is the actual real color P.C.10 was supposed to be), and be “right” with a World War I model. You can even do things like a wing in a different color because it was a replacement, things like that. That kind of effort breaks up the monocolor of RFC/RAF aircraft. You can do them no two the same and be “right.”

    • Ah, should have read on before replying above. Fuselage repaint explains all.

  3. Fantastic work Emeterio.
    Absolutely stunning, I do not know what else to say.
    Very well done sir.

  4. astounding work

  5. Fabulous effort!

  6. Great attention to detail. Overall quality is first rate.
    What did you use for the turnbuckles?

  7. Outstanding craftsmanship and exemplary photography as well. Beautiful job!

  8. This is truly extraordinary.

  9. Simply marvelous! Your weathering and wood work on this model is truly outstanding.

  10. Emeterio, great job!
    Everything is wonderful. Construction, painting, weathering, toning, braces, tree.

    Best regards, Vlad.

  11. Simply Wunderfoll Super Beautiful Model

  12. Oh my that is absolutely beautiful! Very, VERY nice work.

  13. When a model’s detail rivals the actual prototype, you’ve got a winner for sure. A most excellent effort!

  14. Another kit that provides the suspension of reality and disbelief …some of those photos look like the real thing. My vote for “model of month” and ” you like it” are on Emeterio de la Iglesia Blanco’s Sopwith Snipe.

    Green with envy on this kit.

    Two thumbs up with his one.

  15. It’s been a long time of my last post or comment on the site or even modeling anything since I’ve became a father…but seen this beauty its a great source of inspiration! hopefully one day I will be able to come back to my beloved hobby!
    Amazing job Emeterio, and congratulations for what you have achieved!


  16. Very good job, combined with WnW quality of their kits, has resulted in an outstanding model!

  17. MY GOODNESS! Is that the kit interior!? This is a simply stunning job! I love the plywood effect on the inside of the cockpit and the way the paint has chipped off the turtledeck exposing the wood! If this is what is in a Wingnuts kit (I heard the were excellent) I’ll have to try one just because! Very nicely done! It’s nice a company is around that caters to WWI aircraft! (Kind of like Williams with the golden age air racers!)

  18. Taken from WingNut Wings site with regards to PC10-12 theories;
    WW1 aircraft colours are contentious at the best of times and we have done our best to provide what we consider to be accurate painting information. Because Sopwith Snipes were manufactured by over half a dozen companies it is quite likely that they were doped with both PC10 and PC12, although it is only the latter that has been noted on original examples of Snipe fabric we have examined; fabric from late production upper ailerons manufactured by Sopwith (closely matching FS30040) and Whitehead? (closely matching FS26120). There is considerable controversy as to what colour PC10 (Protective Covering number 10) actually was. Made from mixes of yellow ochre, iron oxide and lamp black pigments it varied between olive drab and chocolate brown, depending on the mix and, presumably, time spent exposed to the elements. It appears that fresh PC10 appeared more olive drab while later mixes and aircraft exposed to the elements for some time would appear more chocolate brown. PC12 is slightly less controversial although previous reports of it being red brown are in error and it was actually a dark chocolate brown. The undersides of the wings, tailplane and sometimes the fuselage were left CDL (Clear Doped Linen). Cowlings, fuselage panels, undercarriage and, remarkably, RAF rigging wires were usually painted ‘Service Grey’ or with a PC10/12 equivalent. Some aluminium cowls appear to have been left unpainted and given a ‘turned’ metal finish. The interplane and center section struts and their metal fittings also appear to have been painted grey. Steel components, fittings and brackets were often black although many appear to have been finished in grey. All fabric surfaces exhibited a gloss appearance when new which would lose its shine relatively quickly in service.

  19. Emeterio, the others have already said everything there is to say, I can only add that I like it very, very much!

  20. Emoterio,
    All has already been said so all I can add is this is absolutely a stunning museum masterpiece.

  21. Beautiful Snipe!

  22. I,m reeally thankful for yor kind words! I’m really glad that you liked my Snipe. Those comments make me keep on modelling!!

  23. Fantastic job, your paint is incredible.

    Eric from France

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