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Grenadier, Sixth Army, Stalingrad 1942-43 (Repost)

November 4, 2014 in Figures

Continuing the recent figure-painting theme, this is the last in my current series of larger scale resin figures, in this case, a 120mm (1/16) German Grenadier sculpted by Jeff Shiu (Jeff Shiu Minatures). The only addition has been the weapon’s strap, in this case made from a double strip of lead foil with wire connectors.The base is laburnum with added undergrowth.

The figure has a particularly dynamic quality, emphasised by its directional left-leaning (viewer) forward stance, with the arms and machine gun weighting to the opposite direction to counterbalance the effect. Effectively, the composition follows the lines of a non-equilateral triangle.

Paints used are Vallejo Model Color/Games Color (acrylics).

After the original posting, in the comments that followed I indicated that I had further refined the figure. For my part, these refinements, although subtle, were worth re-photographing, and I think they’re an improvement on the orginal images.

10 additional images. Click to enlarge

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22 responses to Grenadier, Sixth Army, Stalingrad 1942-43 (Repost)

  1. Great work Rob,you portraied the bitterness of this fighting really good !

  2. “…a non-equilateral triangle…” ? Geometry not withstanding, it’s an excellent rendition, Rob. Was the figure a one-piece sculpture?

  3. Great work Rob. You’re getting a real taste for figures.

    • Cheers, Gregor. I have to say I found it difficult to achieve natural shadow detail on the snow smock; white is an unforgiving colour to work against. Since the photos were taken I have in fact gone back and used a white filter over the smock to improve the graduations.

  4. This figure is all about movement. You have brought that to the forefront with your work.
    Exceptional. How from start to finish?

    • Thanks, Al. I usually start with flesh tones, but here decided to do the helmet first in case things got a little messy. Base coated everything else, then base coat plus white/black for first and second highlights/lowlights. Unfortunately everything is pretty much grey, although the uniform has a filter of Russian Green (ironically) to pick up the correct uniform shade. The neckerchief is painted English Uniform to give a little variety, and the groundworks brick rubble is picked out in yellows to contrast with the overall grey effect.
      Since posting I went back and did a little more work to the snow smock as mentioned above, but also did another filter on the cheeks of the face with Brown Sand and Old Rose, to bring up a little more colour in that area.

      That’s probably more than you wanted to know, I’m thinking….

  5. Great figure Rob, I could paint a 1/6th scale figure let alone 1/16 th.
    As the above comments.
    Well done mate.

  6. Very dynamic figure Rob, I think you “captured the moment” exquisitely. Well done indeed.

  7. I agree with others: fantastic job!

  8. Superb. You really catch “a moment in time.”

  9. Very dramatic, Rob, the lighting certainly reflects your paintwork effectively, and the whole scene brings to life the horrors of warfare.

  10. Thanks for posting Rob. Very dramatic pose and you really brought it to life. I like how you are going to do some more work on the face. The job is never finished!

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