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P-47D Thunderbolt Brazilian Air Force – Italy 1944

August 20, 2015 in Aviation

A few people know that Brazilian troops fought shoulder to shoulder with the Allies in Italy against the Axis during World War II.

Even fewer know that Brazilian pilots formed a squadron, the 1st Brazilian Squadron attached to the 350FG.

They flew the powerful P47D Thunderbolts.

I’ve used the good Academy kit in 1/72nd with FCM decals to represent a plane flown by Cap. Fortunato. He was the creator of the distinctive armed ostrich painted on the port side of the motor cowling.

7 additional images. Click to enlarge

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25 responses to P-47D Thunderbolt Brazilian Air Force – Italy 1944

  1. I love this! It’s a great looking airplane Paulo, and I always like seeing national markings we don’t usually see. Thanks for showing us!

  2. Senta a pua!!

    Good looking model in interesting markings. 1/72 scale?

  3. Paulo, Senta a pua! (best I can do, freehand)

  4. Nice looking work, Paulo. I’ve got a couple extra T-bolts in my stash, and like the Brazilian markings so may give that a go on one of them.

  5. Fabulous looking Tbolt!!!! I like the national insignia especially. Well done and congrats on this one!!!

  6. You’re right….I didn’t know about the Brazilian aspect of allied fighter squadrons. But I DO know a good build when I see one and this is it. Nice work.

  7. Paulo, Looks good, it nice to see the different markings,and also nice to see one all loaded up.

  8. Paulo,
    A great looking model and a beautiful homage to Captain Fortunato. Also a fine tribute to our Brazilian allies.

  9. 🙂 … Greetings … 🙂 :
    Like seeing the P-47, this one for no doubt is a sure looker, job well done Paulo.

  10. Well, *I* know all about that, as a result of the research I’m doing in writing “The Bridgebusters: The True Story of the Catch-22 Bomb Wing”, which you will be able to have someone give you for Father’s Day next year (if you tell them you want it). In addition to ground support, the Brazilian squadron, based on Corsica with the rest of the 57th Wing, flew escort missions for the B-25s of the 310th, 321st, and 340th Bomb Groups during “Operation Bingo,” the sustained bombing campaign between November 1 1944 and April 8 1945 against the German supply lines coming through the Brenner Pass. On November 1, the Germans were getting 600% of minimum requirements and it took 8 hours for a train to get from Munich to Bologna, and the US 5th Army, the Brazilian Expeditionary Corps, and the British Eighth Army weren’t strong enough to break the Gothic line in October before winter arrived. (Most of the first rate Allied units had been sent to Britain for the Normandy invasion or to Southern France in August – Italy was seen as a “backwater,” the outcome of which would not affect the end of the war). By April 8, the Germans were getting 40% of minimum requirements, and it took five different trains (and numerous trucks) six days to get from Munich to Bologna. On April 10, the offensive against the Gothic Line began. Three days later the Germans had broken, four days later the Allies were in Bologna, and ten days later the German armies in northern Italy surrendered. The most successful tactical bombing campaign ever, which of course the Hair Farce doesn’t want anyone to know about, since they actually helped the Army for once.

  11. It’s good to hear this subject is buzzing. The first squadron was one of the few “non American” squadron to receive the Presidential Citation in a ceremony presided by President Reagan in 1981 (if my memory is good).

    I’m planning to build more on the subject soon.


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