iModeler

Elevate your modeling today.
Whatever scale modeling means for you,
iModeler brings all the pieces you need and people together
so you can easily share, show and learn.

The Spitfire of the Imperial War Museum

November 5, 2015 in Aviation

Prior to the Telford trip with Martin I got this beauty in front of the lens at London Imperial War Museum.
It looks as if they had taken her from the airfield, cleaned her a bit here and there and hung her from the ceiling in all its beauty.
I thought I must share this with you and tried to capture the wear and tear as good as possible with the iPhone. Most modelers depict the step marks at the wing roots but please also note the chipping at the belly and the rudder and the rubbed down tail ring.
After 70 years the paint still shows some degree of gloss, though not at all areas. Quite surprising to me.

Don’t hesitate to drop me a line via iModeler in-mail if you want additional material or high resultion copies.

13 additional images. Click to enlarge

People who liked this article:
Profile photo of P.kP.kProfile photo of Gregor dGregor dProfile photo of George WilliamsGeorge WilliamsProfile photo of DE4EVERDE4EVERProfile photo of Simon WhitneySimon Whitney

8 responses to The Spitfire of the Imperial War Museum

  1. Not often one sees a museum piece displayed in [supposedly] its’ “original” condition as it appeared when in service. Is this in Duxford or is the IWM a different place?

  2. Very nice example.
    Note the reinforcement bars on the upper surfaces of the wings.
    That is not general but aircraft specific application.
    You can see the same bars on Tamiya s 1/48 Spits Vb .
    Maybe they haved used this example as their reference.

  3. Very nice example.
    Note the reinforcement bars on the upper surfaces of the wings.
    That is not general but aircraft specific application.
    You can see the same bars on Tamiya s 1/48 Spits Vb .
    Maybe they have used this example as their reference.

  4. Glad you’re enjoying your trip, Halvar, looking forward to seeing more pictures from you.

  5. I remember this one. Very educational because of its original paint, with all the scratches and patches. Makes you wonder about one’s weathering techniques

  6. Glad to see they saved the old warhorse, so we could see her and honor the folks who flew and maintained, designed and built the planes that defeated the folks that meant us ill.
    And they didn’t pretty it up, or put some fictitious scheme on it. These days, it’d be a very different story.
    Thanks for posting this, as I may never get there to see it.

Leave a reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.