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My PB4Y-1 ‘Dem Bones

March 31, 2017 in Aviation

This has taken me since mid-January to get done…not because it is so great but because I am so slow…It is the Revell 1/48 B-24D that I have tried to make represent an Atlantic Theater ASW PB4Y-1 (I think that would be the proper USN designation). Looking at some online photos, I came up with the idea to add a Leigh light, and other non-stock features, antenna under the port wing and on the rear spine and used some spare parts box material for depth charges. The Leigh Light has a clear plastic cover but you can’t really see it in the photos.

Along with the Heinkel HE-111 I built prior to this, I am getting really challenged for completed model storage space!

I hope you like it – thanks
R-

13 additional images. Click to enlarge

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16 responses to My PB4Y-1 ‘Dem Bones

  1. Ralph, good to see you! Yes, that is yhe designation, the Navy operated some out of England to close the “Gap” in the Atlantic, where U. S. Based aircraft couldn’t reach. I’ve never seen a Leigh light modeled before. I like the “stickleback” antennae on the spine, too. Sometimes, the photos of the aircraft taken at the time are modified by the censors, as the ECM fit was classified. Did you hand letter the name? It is great to see an antisub aircraft modeled, folks tend to forget what a battle it was getting shipping to the British Isles through Doenitz’ Grey Wolves.
    The RAF had a version of this with rocket rails attached to the nose. I’ll bet that was a sight to see, when they let go at surfaced U-boats.

  2. Hey Bernard, yes the lettering is by hand, a Plan B. Plan A was a flop and Plan B almost couldn’t recover. That stickleback thing is taken from a photo of an RAF (Coastal Command) aircraft. I thought of using the term ‘closing the gap’ in my post title to be clever but you know I just ain’t that sharp….I only found one decent photo of a Leigh Light, at best, mine might be said to ‘bear a general resemblance’ – like a real one, mine is white, cylindrical and hangs from the right wing….a perfect replica!

  3. Nice work, Ralph….maybe you could hang it up (or wall-mount it) to resolve your display space dilemma.

  4. Very nice Ralph, loooooooove the scheme. Don’t recall seeing a Lib in this or any other scale modelled like this. I know what you mean about space, I have 9 1/48 multi-engines unbuilt, should have gone to 1/72 for them. I’m thinking of doing my -24D as an assembly ship, the green and yellow “The Green Dragon”

  5. Great model – I really like it.

    Important information for all of you doing airplanes with turrets:

    They did not have metal framing!!! I am now been around both Martin and Emerson restored turrets – what everyone thinks is metal framing is plastic framing, glued on and NOT PAINTED. I you want to do anything close, paint the “frames” with clear flat, to mimic the glue. the fact they are “flat” in finish is why all the Hex-Spurtz” have declared them metal frames. (My father’s excellent description of an “expert” – “A drip under pressure.”)

    Do. Not. Paint. The. Turrets.

    • Makes sense. Creates “blind spots”. Why have I never seen this ‘tip’ until now?

    • Tom, thanks for clearing that up. I always wondered about the joined edges on turrets, seemed sorta translucent. Closeups, depending on the aircraft or manufacturer kinda give you the idea that they were glued together or a combo of screws and glue.
      I’ve never seen the subject approached before, thank you for adding to the knowledge available! I didn’t fancy painting them faint frames anyhow. Saved again! Boy, that was close!

  6. The turrets on mine are the experimental Acme X-1000 series with metal frames. The Navy didn’t order more because they were too hard but to paint though they found widespread acceptance after the war on the civilian market with manufacturers such as Revell and Monogram

  7. Very nice Ralph, and big as well. Only done one todate and they do take up some space. Really like the Atlantic paint job on this bird. Looks good, I’ll have to do one as well.

  8. Nicely done Ralph. We don’t see many birds done in that ‘Atlantic’ sea-search color scheme.

  9. Great build! Nice scheme and detail.

  10. Nice work Ralph, I really like the scheme !
    I too use the Acme X-1000 turrets on all my bomber builds. They look so much better and drive the rivet counters crazy !

  11. Very nice! I hadn’t thought of doing a 24 in a Navy Atlantic scheme, but I really like it. Luckily for me, I stick to 1/72!!

    Nice added details as well.

  12. Hello Ralph,
    Interesting subject. Nice build. Lumbering above the Atlantic in such a beast must have been quite something.
    The reliability was OK, but nothing compared to todays standard.
    Regards, Orion / The Netherlands.

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