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1/700 IJN Musashi, in the battle of Sibuyan Sea

August 19, 2017 in Ships

I made a mistake. Hardner ratio was too high. So, musashi was melted by high heating temperature. TT
My initial intention was to lean toward reft side 5°degrees. But contrary to my intention, as the resin shrank, it leans to almost 30 degree.
Therefore, I was forced to ignore the historical investigation. I don’t want to be blame for this.

28 additional images. Click to enlarge

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27 responses to 1/700 IJN Musashi, in the battle of Sibuyan Sea

  1. It still looks fantastic….well done despite the troubles

  2. Another fantastic diorama, sir….outstanding work! You should’ve kept the “mistake” to yourself, though. Nobody knew to what degree the list was except you. 🙂

  3. The fire and smoke look very realistic. Fantastic job !!!!

  4. Is it just me, or is this the finest diorama showing fire that I’ve ever seen, “Hey Spielberg or Lucas, you need this guy to help build your movie sets” !.
    This is wonderful to see Won-hui. The only thing I’d like to see is you to suspend those airplanes without a wire or stick. I know that sounds sarcastic, but you’ve already leaped way ahead of what most of us can do, so why not give you a challenge. This is great modeling !

    • “….without a wire [from above] or a stick [from below]…” ?
      The only other way, as far as I know, would be to photo shop them out. They’ve got to have SOME means of support, right…? 🙂

    • You flatter me immensely. Even though I want to make it, I can’t make something more than I can do.
      And I want to fly the aircraft without rod, but I can’t find the solution yet. I considered using wires, but I don’t think that’s the solution.
      As Craig Abrahamson says, photoshop may be the only solution. And I’ve done it before. But now I don’t want to do that.
      I’ve even thought about using magnets. But I couldn’t find a way to fix the aircraft. Like yours, I really want to do that. I’ll be very happy if I find a way someday.

      Anyway….
      Your criticism makes me feel better. Thank you very much.

  5. You flatter me immensely. Even though I want to make it, I can’t make something more than I can do.
    And I want to fly the aircraft without rod, but I can’t find the solution yet. I considered using wires, but I don’t think that’s the solution.
    As Craig Abrahamson says, photoshop may be the only solution. And I’ve done it before. But now I don’t want to do that.
    I’ve even thought about using magnets. But I couldn’t find a way to fix the aircraft. Like yours, I really want to do that. I’ll be very happy if I find a way someday.

    Anyway….
    Your criticism makes me feel better. Thank you very much.

  6. Won-hui, the only reason you are not a professional is that you are not being paid for this (that I know of). This is museum-level modeling. In fact, lots of stuff I’ve seen in museums do not rise to this level of expertise.

    On the rods (which are a very minor issue, I would say), one solution would be to use green screen software. Place your diorama in front of a green screen, paint or mask the rods the same color, and photograph. Employ the software (which is very affordable) and then use a stock backdrop of the Pactific Ocean or whatever you like. Perhaps some would consider this a variation on Photoshop, but it would achieve the effect with the planes as actually part of the diorama instead of mere images you splice in.

    Again, you are an artist an, sir, and I feel like I am getting a deal to see your work for free! So imaginative and creative!

    • Thank you for your comments. I considered using Photoshop. I wanted to use it honestly this time. Fortunately, I am quite good at Photoshop. However, using Photoshop is considered cheating, so I try to avoid using it. Like you said, using Photoshop is also part of diorama. Next time, I want to use Photoshop again. I want to leave an analog feeling this time.

      Thank you very much.

  7. This is very nice. I’ve written extensively on the sinking of Musashi (next iteration is in “Pacific Thunder,” out in October) and this is a good depiction of the event. One minor critique (not a complaint) is that you have the airplanes in 1942 camo and markings. (But you’re not an “airplane guy” so you get a pass here. 🙂 )

    • Thank you for pointing out my mistake. As you say, I don’t know much about airplanes. So I’m going to try to search more historical facts to avoid making this mistakes from next time.
      Thank you for your nice comment anyway.

  8. I think incrible surprising that with some leds and a piece of cotton to achieve these effects.
    Impressive and if we add the effect of water and reflexes he has left me speechless

    Congratulations

  9. The whole model is stunning. Splendid work! Go have a beer!

  10. Won-hui Lee, you are a true artist! As someone else said, I’ve seen dioramas in museums that weren’t as good. It’s a beautiful piece of work!

  11. Another beautiful diorama – I really love the torpedo tracks beneath the surface. Very, very nice!

  12. I wish my mistakes were this impressive…

  13. You sir are one of those builders that makes me wonder why I even try. I have used 1mm clear, Lexan rod in small scale dioramas. One shot makes it look like that might be what you used here.

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