Profile Photo

  • 356 articles
  • 19,972 karma
  • 157 friends

The new Tamiya 1/48 Supermarine Spitfire Mk. I – Visual review

This article is part of a series:
  1. New kit news – Tamiya 1/48 Supermarine Spitfire Mk. I
  2.   The new Tamiya 1/48 Supermarine Spitfire Mk. I – Visual review

Following the electrifying announcement of a new Tamiya Spitfire in 1/48 scale, here’s my review of the actual kit. In search of a more efficient review format, I’ll skip the lengthy introductions, state the facts and let the (extensively commented) pictures do the talking. Please drop me a comment to tell me if this works, and of course do not hesitate to share any other comments or questions!

What is it

Tamiya 1/48 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.I, kit no. 61119
Injection-moulded kit with photoetched and vinyl foil parts
Self-adhesive masks for canopy
Decal sheet with 3 marking options

What’s good

– User-friendly kit engineering
– Flawless, high quality mouldings
– Visible care for detail
– The variety of detail options
– Everything in the kit appears to be well-researched down to the smallest bits of this well-known aircraft
– The engineering and overall finesse of this kit is superior to the otherwise commendable Airfix 1/48 Spitfire Mk. I from 2015.

Things to watch for

– Gluing the windscreen and the armored glass together
– Steel photoetched belts might be stiff to pose naturally on the seat
– With all the detail parts provided for the early pre-war Spitfire variants, the absence of a two-blade Watts propeller (nor the “flat” canopy hood) is a disappointment.

Reviewer’s point of view

Well, this kit is bound to be the new “best” Spitfire Mk. I in this scale. I’m also quite certain (by close examination of the sprues) that it will be followed-up by a Spitfire Mk. V from Tamiya. There, I said it. Happy times!

64 additional images. Click to enlarge.


8 responses to The new Tamiya 1/48 Supermarine Spitfire Mk. I – Visual review

  1. I like this “no-nonsense” review style.

    The kit looks worth buying. Thanks for the great review!

  2. Looks very nice, indeed. But it is strange Tamiya did not include the two-blade Watts propeller and a flat early canopy while they were at it. They invented new way to use a slid back canopy and put so much attention to detail in other areas.

    I would probably glue the armoured wind screen using floor polish. Flood the surface then plop the armoured front section on.

    • Thanks @stellan. Floor polish is what I have thought of. I have looked through the parts & instructions one more time and think that maybe this it is designed as a click-together joint. There’s a separate windscreen part (D8) to be used with the armoured glass, an the latter has two tiny location tabs at the bottom to ensure precise positioning, and perhaps a positive joint. It is too hard to see how the windscreen assembly works without actually trying, and the instructions (pic 52) don’t seem to give any definitive information whether to use glue or not.

      Either way, one should be careful to get this right and someone inexperienced (and using plastic glue only) may stand a risk of spoiling the model at this point.

      • This looks like another superb model from Tamiya.

        I can see what you mean about attaching the armoured windscreen (Part D1) to the main windscreen (Part D8).

        I think the two location pins you mentioned on D8 will be enough to hold D1 in place with just a small amount of glue. This area will be hidden when the model is finally painted.

        I’m not sure, but it looks as if Tamiya have provided masking for both external, and interior faces of part D1.

        Thanks for posting the review Martin.
        I think your review format works very well.

  3. I like how Tamiya opened up holes in the lower roundels to ease their placement on the wings.

  4. Very informative review, and thanks for NOT providing the history of the subject in question. That is information I really can do without in any kit review.

    As for a Mk V, I’m happy that Tamiya provide clues towards a second version but – going by Tamiya’s release pattern – I guess a Mk V can come next year or maybe in the next decade.
    Let us hope on the former… 🙂

  5. I really like the format of your review. Photos and comments on them very helpful. Looking forward to more!

  6. Thank you for wonderful article shearing. I do like it. IPC’s (Infrastructure Preservation Corporation’s) contribution int the inspection of post tension tendon tendons with the help of nondestructive testing and robotics.

Leave a Reply