Vickers Valiant ”down under”

  • 68 posts
  • Last reply 20 hours, 45 minutes ago
  • 1/72, Airfix, atomic, Australia, RAF, Vickers
Viewing 16 - 30 of 68 posts
  • Paul Barber said 5 months ago:

    I’ve just had a look at some photos of the finished article – very very impressive – but I go into a cold sweat at the mention of vacuform! Even canopies – which I need to work on in general – cause consternation!

  • Tom Cleaver said 5 months ago:

    It may be that I did certain models when I was too young to know they were “difficult” (building and rigging the old Hawk Nieuport 17 and the other Aurora WW1 models when I was 10-12) and starting out with balsa models, but vacuforms are easy, so long as you have the hand-eye coordination to touch your nose with your right index finger three times in succession. Just “take your time.” Here’s a vacuform Falcon Models Spitfire XVIII of 208 Squadron for the “RAF 100.” Still the most accurate Griffon Spitfire in terms of overall shape. Done with a resin cockpit and landing gear and prop from an Academy kit.

    3 attached images. Click to enlarge.

  • Paul Barber said 5 months ago:

    I think you my have hit the nail on the head – as a kid I fumbled around with Revell and Airfix that mostly ended up covered in glue and brush hairs. Things changed at 14 when a French family, whose son I had been on an exchange with, sent me home with a 1/24 ‘Me109’ as we called them back then. And like so many others I drifted until I came back to it (on the verge of) being past my potentially best years!

    And of course thank you, for what I think is our first Griffon Spit!

  • Tom Cleaver said 5 months ago:

    Oh yeah, I wouldn’t want anyone to see those models mentioned from my youth. But “fearlessness” is a good attitude to have as a modeler. It’s only a plastic toy and if it doesn’t turn out, there’s always the trash bin. It’s the learning that’s the fun of it (at least for me). The only three things a modeler needs are: 1) pay attention to the project; 2) take your time to get it right; 3) have fun and learn.

  • Paul Barber said 5 months ago:

    Couldn’t agree more – lifelong learning – and reboots to challenge yourself!

  • david leigh-smith said 5 months ago:

    There’s a ton of research out there to show that the main protective factors against ill health as we enter that ‘golden’ age are maintaining eye/hand co-ordination, learning, maintaining challenges in life, and social contact.

    And sniffing glue, of course.

  • Tom Cleaver said 5 months ago:

    You’re saying iModeler is a public health project? 🙂

  • david leigh-smith said 5 months ago:

    Yep, I AM saying iModeler is a public health project. Well done us!

  • Allan J Withers said 5 months ago:

    Thanks Paul !!

  • Allan J Withers said 4 months, 3 weeks ago:

    A bit of work on cleaning up the inlets.

    2 attached images. Click to enlarge.

  • Allan J Withers said 4 months, 2 weeks ago:

    Windows in and decals on with Future !

    1 attached image. Click to enlarge.

  • Paul Barber said 4 months, 2 weeks ago:

    I really like those decals Allan. I sometimes think decals don’t cut it for interiors – but those are full of contrast and really look the part. That contrast should mean they stand out even once the construction grows up around them. As ever, really impressive skills!

  • Allan J Withers said 4 months, 2 weeks ago:

    Thanks Paul, they wont be all that visible when it’s together !!

  • Tom Cleaver said 4 months, 2 weeks ago:

    David – does two books a year count? 🙂

  • david leigh-smith said 4 months, 2 weeks ago:

    Definitely, Tom. We used to think it was just ‘exercising’ the brain that was protective, but as scanning gets more sophisticated we can see it’s taking on new information/ideas and learning new skills that’s important. Allows the neutrons to knit together different areas of the brain (especially in short and long term memory) and ‘grows’ your mental capacity into older life. Writing and research absolutely qualifies.

Viewing 16 - 30 of 68 posts