WiP – Verlinden 120mm US Navy pilot (Pacific WWII)

  • 28 posts
  • Last reply 5 months, 2 weeks ago
Viewing 16 - 28 of 28 posts
  • Adolfo Coelho said 5 months, 2 weeks ago:

    The head has been going through a long process of changing, trying to improve, such as these:

    Same with the main body, legs and torso (hence the uniform, gun holster, belt, parachute harness, etc.) .

    Things have been improving, changing, there’s the drying time factor, time waiting, now I’ve been using very thinned glazes over main areas, the uniform basically (not easily visible on the last pic sadly, will try better pics later on Sun light) .

    Head, face are now done:

    And that is where I am now:

    Cheers!

    Dolf

  • Jeff Bailey said 5 months, 2 weeks ago:

    ‘Dolf, this guy looks great! I’m going to call him “Ace” if that’s OK with you.

    @dolfdylan

  • Adolfo Coelho said 5 months, 2 weeks ago:

    Thank you Jeff (@mikegolf) .

    Ace is a cool name/nickname, I’m fine with that 🙂

    Cheers!

    Dolf

  • Jeff Bailey said 5 months, 2 weeks ago:

    All right! Ace it is! @dolfdylan

    I’ll tell you this, ‘Dolf – Ace is looking real good! Truthfully, I didn’t think figures were much worth doing, but after seeing Ace and some others here or there, I’ve realised that those figures are real models, just not so many parts. The care & planning I’ve “watched” you do and seeing him grow is pretty interesting!

  • Adolfo Coelho said 5 months, 2 weeks ago:

    Jeff (@mikegolf) ,

    Ace it is then 🙂

    Ace is being the experimental test with my adventures with oil paints.
    I know already that I made a beginner’s usual mistake, by applying too much paint to the overall uniform area (which is the larger part of the figure, legs + torso), which is resulting in two problems that I’m now in the process of trying to solve/save…
    The drying time of that uniform paint is taking a too long time, and also IMO it looks too shinny (cloth, especially uniforms’ cloth, shouldn’t look shinny, not even in the Southern Pacific Sea, right?), so have been trying to correct these two issues.
    Applying a thinnier “shadowing” darker colors on the lows on the pleats (both the pants and the shirt), to which I mixed a good amount of “águarrás” (a kind of “white spirit”) and a couple of drops of Liquin Original – which is supposed to help increase the drying time, making the process go faster, but also tends to give a Satin varnish look where applied, and I don’t want that, I want the uniform to be as matt as possible; probably now only much later, when in a few months all oils are fully dry and hardened, may I apply a coat of a final matt varnish; in the meantime, as the oils go drying, in some cases former shinnier areas tend to become more kind of matt – ) .
    I may have to apply various glazes of thinnier & thinnier tones over the dried ones, as time goes by.

    Funny enough, the Mae West, which at some point was pretty shinny (as it shold look like in reality, because of the kind of tissues involved on its fabric), after a few new tones (looking for the best yellowish-orangish look they have, based on the photos poste above), became a bit matt. I may have solved this too, in this case by just applying a dilluted bit of Liquin, mixed with a tiny old remaining of the original color, to the Mae West (giving it again a final more glossy look, which is what I want to achieve here) .
    Will have to wait a couple of days more and see how this goes.

    So yes, in a sense Ace has been a teacher… and a guinea pig… lol…

    Cheers!

    Dolf

  • Adolfo Coelho said 5 months, 2 weeks ago:

    These pics are not really good, as they were taken right after the Sun set on this valley (but still enough Sun light from the sky), but they show better than previously posted pics the recent work on glazing shadowing tones on the uniform:

    Cheers!

    Dolf

  • Jeff Bailey said 5 months, 2 weeks ago:

    It looks great but I understand where you’re coming from. The differences between matte and shiny fabrics or rubberised materials is evident when you see them in person. I never wore a Mae West, but I have had uniform pieces or seperate parts that were made of new space-age materials. For instance, our NOMEX tanker suits which are made to be fire resistant, come from the factory with almost a satin sheen, and are much less matte looking. However, as they get worn and more importantly – get washed, they take on a much more matte finish. (It also causes them to lose their fire resistance – NOT GOOD) These NOMEX suits are a Tanker’s version of the flight suit pilots wear, just a different color and somewhat different pockets arrangement. It also includes a jacket, gloves (the exact same as pilot’s gloves) and a hood. It’s all wonderful … until you have it all on, then put the NBC suit on OVER it (protection against chemical agents – NBC means Nuclear,Biological, & Chemical) and it happens to be 112 degrees F because you’re in the Iraqi desert! PLUS, you’re in an M1 series tank that has a jet engine for power which has an exhaust temperature of nearly 1000 degrees F! Believe you me, we were miserable! I miss being in my tank and that life but I sure don’t miss the lack of comfort!! But I apologise for getting off the subject of YOUR great figure of our buddy Ace!

    I wish I had some help for you, but I have exactly ZERO experience with any oil paint that doesn’t go on part of a house! (And precious little experience there, either – we mostly use acrylic paints in our homes these days – it’s MUCH easier to work with.)

    My point? You’re doing great, ‘Dolf! The amount of experimenting and thought you’re putting into this figure is going to all work out to a great figure in the end. Well done, Amigo!

  • Adolfo Coelho said 5 months, 2 weeks ago:

    Hi Jeff (@mikegolf)

    Yes, different types of cloth (or some extras, case of the Mae West, others) are made from different materials, and some are/look more “natural”, while others are/seem more synthetic, some have a more matt color, others a more shinny one.

    For now I consider Ace kind of 95% finished (there’s still work to be done, but I just cant’t do it right now), will get back to it in a couple of months or so.

    Cheers!

    Dolf

  • david leigh-smith said 5 months, 2 weeks ago:

    Don’t have any idea how I missed this. A great thread with terrific information, a brilliant build at it’s heart, and a lot of fun. What more could you want? Fantastic.

    Great stuff, Dolf.

  • Adolfo Coelho said 5 months, 2 weeks ago:

    David (@dirtylittlefokker)

    Thanks.

    Still missing:

    – an American flag on top of his right arm (I have one ordered, at this scale – believe 120mm is approximately the same as a classic 1/12 scale, if not mistaken, theoretically 1/13; but terrible as I am with numbers, could be wrong, so please feel free to correct me – but don’t have it yet) .
    – a black dash line along the center of his parachute harness (have to buy an appropriate marker allowing to write on oil paint) .
    – the whole uniform area is still not fully dry. When it will be (and that could take a few months), legs & torso & arms will be covered on a Mat final varnish.
    While the Mae West may be covered in a Satin varnish.
    Before that, as time goes by, and new colors are acquired, and as the paint dries, I may be improving some details (working kind of “wet on… not fully dry, not fully wet”) .

    There’s also something I may try (but that will be a little messy), which is fix, by filling with Milliput, those joining areas between arms and torso (especially on the front side of his left arm, there’s a significant “hole” in there…) .
    That would be a major renovation, and for working I need the oil to be fully dry. So that may have to wait.
    If I do it I’ll update this thread with new info and new pics.

    I believe this guy is the same scale of my Lawrence of Arabia bust.
    I realize it’s too small for my eyes and my hands…
    I may have to pick a larger scale bust (1/10, 1/9) to replace Lawrence of Arabia. There are plenty, movies related, out there.

    Cheers!

    Dolf

  • david leigh-smith said 5 months, 2 weeks ago:

    I really cannot wait to see your Lawrence of Arabia build. That looks an amazing bust!

  • Adolfo Coelho said 5 months, 2 weeks ago:

    A couple more pics, showing the for now semi-complete (well, a bit more than that) 120mm figure:

    Cheers!

    Dolf

  • Adolfo Coelho said 5 months, 2 weeks ago:

    David (@dirtylittlefokker)

    “I really cannot wait to see your Lawrence of Arabia build. That looks an amazing bust!”

    I may have to change my original suggestion.
    As I’ve noticed with this fellow Ace (the US Navy pilot, which I believe is approximately the same scale as the Lawrence of Arabia bust), this scale may be a bit too small for both my eyes and in a certain way also the formness of my hands…

    I know of some other larger scale busts out there. related to movies, that I may pick instead.

    I do love Lawrence of Arabia (the character on the film, most certainly because it’s Peter O’Toole), and I like this bust a lot, but I may need some more practice on larger pieces first, before I do this Lawrence.

    There’s for instance this Taxi Driver/Robert de Niro bust (a 200mm 1/9 bust is easier for the eyes and the hands 🙂 ) :

    http://www.pegasomodels.it/productdetails_en.asp?id=753#

    There are plenty more, Marilyn Monroe (a 1/10th bust: https://www.elgrecominiatures.co.uk/collections/life-miniatures/products/bye-bye-baby-marilyn-monroe-in-korea-uso-tour1954 ), Laurel & Hardy (a beautiful duo set, in 1/10 scale : https://scale75.com/en/busts-to-scale/87-laurel-and-hardy.html ; I’ve seen it both painted in “b&w”, as well as in color), and so many more…

    Cheers!

    Dolf

Viewing 16 - 28 of 28 posts