Arco dei Fileni, Lybia 1941/42, 1:35 Scale, Scratchbuild

  • 54 posts
  • Last reply 1 week ago
  • Arco dei Fileni, diorama, Horace, Lybia, North Africa
Viewing 16 - 30 of 54 posts
  • Michel Verschuere said 1 month, 2 weeks ago:

    Today I continued the central arc, up there where the ridges are situated. This required quite a bit of measurement to get everything straight and level. I think I will keep the uppermost level detachable in order for making the model easier to transport.

    Next step is now the side galleries, I already started to think how to engineer these. I hope to be able to give the model some more time tomorrow so that soon, the main shape will become apparent.

    So long, Michel.

  • Michel Verschuere said 1 month, 1 week ago:

    Today I managed to give the model some time. I finished the main construction of the Northern and Southern galleries. I added surface detail around the windows on both side. Starts to look the part!

    I tried to take a shot like in the picture below, but I guess the lens on my phone camera is not of the same type so could not reproduce 100%.

    That was the original, this is as far as I could replicate it:

    Good, no?

    Tomorrow is the time to start adding the ridges on the Arc and roofs to the both galleries, they have the same structure as you can see from the historical pictures in this thread.

    Hope you like it!

    So long, Michel.

  • Jeff Bailey said 1 month, 1 week ago:

    Michel;
    My hat is off to you for this superb bit of modeling! I wish I had a fraction of your talent.
    Finding things like this in the desert is very interesting, especially to a kid who grew up wanting to be an Archaeologist, but went to school to be a Music Teacher, then (after finding out that school teaching wasn’t what I had hoped) ending up as a tank Platoon Sergeant & M1A1 Master Gunner. While in Iraq during Desert Storm, I had the opportunity to see THIS in the desert.
    This is the Temple of Ur, which has been around a while. It is mentioned twice in the Old Testament of the Bible and is a national treasure – much as your arch SHOULD be. (Gaddafi was a real sh . thead for destroying something like that, even though it was not ancient.)

    Anyway, your work is absolutely stunning and beautiful. I really look forward to more about this!

    1 attached image. Click to enlarge.

  • Michel Verschuere said 1 month, 1 week ago:

    Thanks Jeff! I wonder about this Temple of Ur, you have a picture on it? Maybe a next project you in your M1A1 next to it! Ah, see it now… I’ll start buying a bigger house to fit a 1/35 scale copy… 😀

  • Jeff Bailey said 1 month, 1 week ago:

    PS – Obviously, we couldn’t drive our tanks on it or under an arch like the photo you showed! LoL! Simply seeing this was quite interesting!

  • Michel Verschuere said 1 month, 1 week ago:

    Today I managed to detail the Northern and Southern galleries. Looks like ok. I was surprised that, for a model this size, dimensional deviations remained within 1mm on a model almost 1m tall. Thats 1 in 1000! The secreat is measure, measure, measure until you drop, obviously…

    Tomorrow more work on the galleries and the foundations, then I can turn to the upper half of the model, including the altar. That will be the last step, after a good sanding session…

    Take care!
    Michel.

  • George R Blair Jr said 1 month, 1 week ago:

    I like watching your progress. I am interested to see how you do the figures and other carvings. Well done.

  • Michel Verschuere said 1 month, 1 week ago:

    @gblair thanks George for your interest. Yes, the figures and bas-relief are an interesting feat. I thought a lot about techniques to make them already. I think I figured it out how to make them, will be a lot of work for sure! I’ll keep you posted my friend!

  • Jeff Bailey said 1 month, 1 week ago:

    Michel, this monument miniature is itself a monumental work and one in which you’ve captured the look perfectly … in 1/35th scale! Beautiful. It’s really coming along well.

    They didn’t allow our tanks within 500 m of the Temple of Ur because of possible damage done to the ancient temple by the vibrations. At that time it was considered to be one of two most likely locations where the old “Hanging Gardens of Babylon” were likely located, though I believe they now know for sure that the Temple of Ur was NOT the actual location. It was located about a half mile (a bit less than 1 k) from a large Iraqi air base which had been all but destroyed by bombing, so they wanted no more possible damage to the Temple if it could be helped.

    I had my Driver’s camera during the war because he’d given me the camera saying “You’ll get better pictures than I will being down in the Driver’s hole.” (I was the Commander and as such, I was able to be partially “exposed” except during actual battle, so taking photos was pretty simple.) I took 3 rolls of 36 exposure 35mm film over the course of the war, but sadly, because of Army “needs” we (all of us tankers – 36 in all / 9 tanks) were separated into different units before we left Iraq after the shooting was over and I never saw my driver again, so I never saw the photos after he had the film developed ‘back home.’ Once again I’m bemoaning the fact that the digital camera age hadn’t yet begun. I’m pretty confident that I got some really good “shots” on those 108+ photos I took! Oh well. There are ways available these days to contact “old friends” and/or fellow Army unit guys but I don’t know how. And Fort Riley, Kansas was a huge base with a LOT of different units – and soldiers – there at that time because of the war. I don’t even remember his proper name … only that I called him “J-Bird Johnson” because he was skinny & tall like a stork and his family name is Johnson.

  • Michel Verschuere said 1 month, 1 week ago:

    @mikegolf yes I can imagine the tremor coming from an M1A1 Abrams MBT. The vehicles that passed this Arc in the early war years were by no means overtaxed in that way. The Panzer III was about 25-35t heavy when loaded. This monument was placed in a roundabout so it appears from this picture. Nevertheless, most of the pictures I could retrieve showed vehicles passing underneath the Arc, so not making the roundabout detour.

    Maybe the reason for that was that the main enemy of the Axis forces were the British commonwealth troops, these drove on the left. You could get shot at first of course, but getting hurt in a road accident bumping into your enemy on a roundabout was maybe perceived as a worse fate (less cool in today’s language), hahah…

  • Jeff Bailey said 1 month, 1 week ago:

    LoL! Yes, I wouldn’t want to “bump into” any enemies during a conflict! That seems rather unhealthy.

    Our fully loaded M1A1 (HA) tanks weighed around 73 tons as we went into battle. We had 12,000 rounds of 7.62 MG ammo, 1,500 rounds of cal. 50 (both figures were more than the usual ‘combat load’ of 10,000 & 1,000, respectively) plus a 6-man wall tent, 4 cots, 2 complete camo net systems including poles – none of which were used more than once; plus all our personal gear including plenty of “pogey bait” (snacks, popcorn, chips (crisps) and cans of soup/beanie-weenies/canned fruit/ etc.). Add to that extra chemical warfare detection equipment & decontamination supplies, and other things I have forgotten 28 years later! (Below is a bad photo of my panzer while we were still loading junque on board)

    Michel, please forgive me: I didn’t intend to hijack your thread!

    1 attached image. Click to enlarge.

  • Michel Verschuere said 1 month, 1 week ago:

    No hijack at all @mikegolf, glad to see you every time in this corner 😀

    And what a beauty your limousine was. I read it was quite comfortable inside the M1A1, fully airconditioned. Makes you think how hot it was in the desert war of 1941-1943.

  • Jeff Bailey said 1 month, 1 week ago:

    Hello again, Michel!

    Actually, our (then) new M1A1 (HA) [Heavy Armor} tanks were not air-conditioned inside. They would broil the crew just like the WWII tanks could. What we DID have was an uncomfortable heating/air conditioned system made for our NBC (Nuclear/Biological/Chemical) protective system that our gag-bags (Protective Masks) plugged into that included an uncomfortable vest we could wear that DID spread air conditioned or heated air on our upper bodies. The theory (a good one, IMHO) was that a large filtration system carried on the tank was better than the small ones we wore around our waist (it was) but if a tank were parked somewhere during winter – perhaps Alaska, where it gets COLD – and that system pumped this highly filtered, but below or WAY below freezing air through our protective masks, it could freeze lungs! So, they provided a heating system. Then in a flash of brilliance, they added a cooling system for hot climates, THEN they got the idea about the vests. IF you were sitting in a hot tank and not having to move much (like the Driver or Gunner) the vest system was actually pretty nice, but if you had to move around a lot, like the Loader and Tank Commander did, the vest became restrictive, scratchy, and generally uncomfortable and if you had to disconnect from the system to get on top of the tank or off it, the vest was more uncomfortable. I suppose it was better than nothing. That was the way it worked, but we seldom wore the vests, making the cool or heated system nonexistent. Now – here comes the brilliant solution we tankers came up with: we simply would tuck the hose into our shirt or even our trousers and let the heated or cooled air do its’ business! THAT worked well and was a LOT better than nothing in the summer. The tanks always had heaters (well, almost always) that worked well. TOO well. most of the time, in my opinion, but I personally get along MUCH better in cold conditions than hot … but that’s just me. Certainly NOT the way most guys were, especially those guys who cam from our most Southern states, where it’s much warmer than the Northern states.

  • Jeff Bailey said 1 month, 1 week ago:

    I’m not sure about the new M1A2s. They MAY have air conditioned turrets, but I was never on an operational A2.

  • Michel Verschuere said 1 month, 1 week ago:

    A short update. Today I worked more on the details of the North and South galleries. This is rather fiddly work, not spanning a large area, but nevertheless important. I guess I need another 4-5 hours to finish the lower part of the arc, including the foundations. I’ll do that first and then turn to the upper part of the monument.

    Everything was based on this side view picture.

    Hope you like it!

    Michel.

Viewing 16 - 30 of 54 posts