1/48 Hasegawa A6M3 type 22

28 posts · Last reply 3 days, 16 hours ago
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    Woody Kubacki said 1 month ago:

    HI all, it's been a long time since I've posted here, but don't worry (!) I have been building. I actually have a handful of models on the go, which is not something I like doing. Anyway, I've been working on the old Hasegawa A6M3 (two actually) in order to clear out my Zero collection in anticipation of the new Eduard Zeros.

    Surprisingly, I didn't take any photos of the cockpit before I closed up the fuselage, but since the detail isn't memorable, nothing much was lost. As with all Hasegawa Zero kits, one must be careful with the fit of the gun troughs to eliminate as much sanding and filling as possible. The oil cooler is a separate piece as in the A6M2 kit, but this time it fit much better, as did the wings to fuselage.

    I used a chunk of clear sprue for the wingtip lights as the clear parts didn't fit very well (this is something I'm working on improving my skills on), and added a rod on the left side .

    10 attached images. Click to enlarge.

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    Woody Kubacki said 1 month ago:

    Next up I primed the plan with Mr Surfacer 1500 to check for imperfections. There were 2 sink marks on the underside of the wings which needed to be filled in. Also, about a month ago I finally received my order of MRP paints, after a 3 month wait. These are hard to come by in Canada as no one sells them here and almost no one ships these here .

    8 attached images. Click to enlarge.

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    Woody Kubacki said 1 month ago:

    Next up I painted silver (LP-11) and a red oxide primer (4 parts hull red to one part red), for chipping, but I don't think I will be chipping this plane much. Perhaps a bit of abrasion of the green camo and maybe some of the olive grey, but I'll decide later on when all the paint is on. The primer looks garish in the photos but it is a lot more subdued in person.

    9 attached images. Click to enlarge.

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    Woody Kubacki said 1 month ago:

    Next up was designing the masks for the markings. I will be painting my model in the colours of UI-157, as seen in an NHK newsreel. While designing the markings, I noticed Hasegawa has the placement of the wing Hinomaru in the wrong spot.

    I also used the new MRP paint to paint the cowl. It takes some getting used to as MRP is pre mixed and quite thin, I had to lower my pressure from my usual 15 psi to 8-10 psi.

    5 attached images. Click to enlarge.

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    Woody Kubacki said 1 month ago:

    Finally I was able to start on the painting of the exterior. I used a variety of colours for the marbling and then used MRP Mitsubishi Olive grey for the top coat. Honestly, after the top green camo, I doubt that the marbling will be visible at all. The MRP paint was sprayed at about 8-10 psi, and the final result was a very smooth finish.

    9 attached images. Click to enlarge.

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    Woody Kubacki said 1 month ago:

    Next up were the markings. I designed the masks so that their position were determined by lining up the masks against a prominent panel line. This all worked well except for the fuselage hinomaru. Not only were they positioned too high, but one side of the mask was very thin and caused some warping of the mask (Oramask 810). I sanded off the hinomaru and repainted them. I am not 100 percent happy with them but I have learned not to make my masks so thin so I'll chalk it up as something to learn from.

    9 attached images. Click to enlarge.

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    Woody Kubacki said 1 month ago:

    Next up were the leading edge bands (also masked) and the no walk lines and tail code. I decided to only paint the "UI" in red (they were painted this way in japan) and leave the "157" to be painted later. When the field green was sprayed, the code was sprayed over and to improve the visibility of the code, the 157 was painted over in white.

    I ordered a set of Eduard A6M2 masks, as I didn't want to use the thick Hasegawa ones. For the most part, the A6M2 masks were also applicable to the A6M3. The carrier film was very thin and adhered perfectly to the paint (no glossing before decals), and after they were dried I scraped off the carrier film with a toothpick.

    7 attached images. Click to enlarge.

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    Woody Kubacki said 1 month ago:

    For the propeller stripes, I designed the mask such that the end of them would be placed at the tip of the blade and the stripes would be placed in the proper location. I borrowed the early type droptank from the Tamiya A6M5 (new tool kit) and painted it bare metal. I have seen these either painted underside colour or left bare, and to make this interesting I painted it in bare metal (Mr Color Super Metallic SM208 Duralumin)

    6 attached images. Click to enlarge.

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    Woody Kubacki said 1 month ago:

    And finally, the field applied camo. I was a bit nervous spraying this, as it could ruin the look of the model. I played around with pressures and MAC valve settings and found a perfect setting after spraying my mule from the A6M2 build. I can imagine how the field camo was painted, but replicating it in scale would be tricky. Obviously the guy who painted these was working with a narrower spray pattern and was trying to cover as much of the airframe as possible, but not worrying about leaving spots unpainted. This is similar to how I painted my Ki-44, in that there would be regular back and forth spray patterns, with the spray deviating around parts of the airframe, existing markings, and the phyical limitations of spraying the plane. I didnt want this to look like a giant sprayed this plane, I wanted to make i look like someone did id wo started fresh and probably got tired as the day wore on.

    I sprayed with the crown cap removed and about 15mm from the surface of the model. This resulted in 1-3mm wide spray patterns which i think look scale enough. Next up are the wings, and I have been thinkin thinking about how these were painted, probably starting with the wing tips and moving inwards, with spray patterns changing at the wing tips, and then around the hinomaru and then near the yellow bands and back towards the rear/inner parts of the wings.

    3 attached images. Click to enlarge.

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    Woody Kubacki said 1 month ago:

    Painted the wings tonight. Need to go over a few spots and blend in areas where I lingered too long

    4 attached images. Click to enlarge.

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    Spiros Pendedekas said 1 month ago:

    Might have been a while since you last posted, but what a re-entry you made, my friend @wkubacki! What a superb build of the not bad Hasegawa kit! Almost done and looking forward to it!
    Thanks for yet another entry to our Empire of Japan Group!

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    John vd Biggelaar said 1 month ago:

    An amazing comeback, Woody @wkubacki.
    Nice work done on this Hasegawa kit, beautiful chosen scheme.

  • Profile Photo
    Woody Kubacki said 1 month ago:

    Thank you very much guys. I was meaning to post up more regularly but I didn’t have the time. These early SWPA Zeros remind me of the varied camo on army planes, and it’s that variety that draws me towards them.

    Merry Christmas everyone, I’ll probably get back with more updates after Boxing Day.

  • Profile Photo
    Louis Gardner said 1 month ago:

    Woody Kubacki (@wkubacki)
    This Zero looks incredible ! I especially like how you did a tiny / thin fan pattern when you painted the Green squiggles. Also, what did you use for the propeller blades ? They look exceptional. I have been using Molotow chrome on my last batch of propeller blades. On occasion I have used foil for the same effects.

    I'll be looking for your next posting. Thanks. Merry Christmas to you too, and Happy New Year.

  • Profile Photo
    Woody Kubacki said 1 month ago:

    @lgardner For the most part, I tried to paint the camo in a back and forth motion, as I think that would be the most effective way that the actual plane would get the most coverage from the least amount to spray. When the space got tight, the pattern would change to follow it, or the pattern would get random, and I think that would reflect the frustration/tiredness/wanting to move on of the crewman who was painting them.

    For the propellor blades I used my tried and true Mr Color Super Metallic line of paints. It was either SM206 super chrome silver or SM208 Duralumin. I thin the paints about 70-80% with Mr Color Rapid thinner and spray them on quite Willy-nilly. Because they are so thin you don’t get a lot of build up of paint (reducing the chances of runs) and the rapid thinner allows the paint to dry very quickly , also reducing the chances of runs. In fact, you can spray it on in heavy coats and it always seems to come out nice and shiny

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