Eduard MIG-21 MF 1/48, Nationale Volksarmee

  • 27 posts
  • Last reply 3 years, 9 months ago
  • 1/48, Eduard, MIG-21 MF, Nationale Volksarmee
Viewing 1 - 15 of 27 posts
  • Johannes Gerl said 4 years, 1 month ago:

    Dear fellow modelers,
    this is my new project. It is a premier for me in the respect that I can visit the original whenever I want, as it is located in a museum around the corner. I brought extensive photography home last time I went there.
    The subject is very interesting to me as it shows good wear all over the airframe and history made this aircraft a NATO aircraft for a short period after the German reunion, wearing Western German insignia.
    Although the original kit is quite detailed already, I was tempted by the so-called “Big Sin” pack from Eduard, containing all after market products offered by the company in a set.
    Enjoy!

    1 attached image. Click to enlarge.

  • Johannes Gerl said 4 years, 1 month ago:

    The resin parts of the engine nozzle have been cleaned and primed with Gunze Mr Surfacer 1200. Detail is very good except for the flame stabilizer that shows heavy flash. I found it a process too little rewarding to remove the excess resin from this very fragile part and decided to use the original kit one instead.
    It was a great moment when I removed the sprue from the parts with the turbine blades. The blades are merged to the sprue originally and sawing it off suddenly let’s the space between the blades appear.
    Note the green paint typical for Soviet aircraft inside the nozzle being partly burned of. The metal parts have been painted with different shades of Alclad2.

    7 attached images. Click to enlarge.

  • Johannes Gerl said 4 years, 1 month ago:

    Unpleasant moulding relicts were found inside the fuselage halfs closely to the nozzle and removed with a chiselle. The surface detail there seemed a bit to flat and was scratch built with 0,5 mm styrene rod.

    5 attached images. Click to enlarge.

  • Johannes Gerl said 4 years, 1 month ago:

    Up next: the cockpit.
    There is no such thing as THE Russian cockpit green, but I learned the hard way: Mr. Paint`s interpretation of Russian cockpit green and Eduard’s are kind of different.
    I mixed the matching tone myself.

    I’ve heard through the grapevine that this colour was selected to give the pilot a feeling of wellbeing and thus increasing their performance. Comments highly appreciated …

    3 attached images. Click to enlarge.

  • George Johnson said 4 years, 1 month ago:

    That looks great, Halvar. I have had to mix my own Russian green as well. The Eduard colors never match anything. I sprayed my Eduard PE with clear matte after installation and that helps, too. Makes a big difference.

    Yes, it is true, greens were found to be very soothing and for a long time, it was used in operating rooms in the U.S. for that reason. Turns out we humans have far more green receptors in our retinas than red or blue. We can discern more shades of green than any other color. Digital cameras have the same proportion of Green to blue and red sensors and not by coincidence.

  • Johannes Gerl said 4 years, 1 month ago:

    Thanks, George.
    Cockpit parts finished, all sealed with a layer of Mr. Colour Semi Gloss, now awaiting fitting and weathering.

    3 attached images. Click to enlarge.

  • Johannes Gerl said 4 years, 1 month ago:

    Wheel wells cleaned and ready for priming. Note the photo etched pieces glued to the resin parts of the main landing gear: very good detail.
    Interesting Eduard’s modified brand promise!

    3 attached images. Click to enlarge.

  • Deleted User said 4 years, 1 month ago:

    Very nice preparation pics, Halvar…how do you achieve a completely white background with no shadows?

  • Johannes Gerl said 4 years, 1 month ago:

    Craig, that’s a white under-plate, the LED lights of my magnifying glass and the iPhone camera.

    1 attached image. Click to enlarge.

  • Johannes Gerl said 4 years, 1 month ago:

    Some oil dot fading was applied to the wheel wells that had been primed and painted in Gunze Neutral Gray before and finally a black-brownish oil wash brought their look reasonably close to the reference.

    5 attached images. Click to enlarge.

  • Johannes Gerl said 4 years, 1 month ago:

    Cockpit final weathering with a black oil wash.

    3 attached images. Click to enlarge.

  • Johannes Gerl said 4 years, 1 month ago:

    I used a, at least for me, relatively new product for the nose cone: flexible Tamiya tape. The performance is as you’d expect it from Tamiya, conforming nicely to the cone in spite of strongly different radii at upper and lower end.

    2 attached images. Click to enlarge.

  • Editor said 4 years, 1 month ago:

    Following this with interest. Your photo setup is as simple as it is interesting. Normally (or: by the “old school”) you would have to tweak with exposure settings to clip the backgrounds to white like you do. Do you adjust the brightness in the iPhone camera, or just shoot on automatic? These are great detail pictures. I also reckon that the circular lamp does a lot in softening the shadows.

  • Johannes Gerl said 4 years, 1 month ago:

    Now to the assembly of the airframe.
    The fit of this Eduard kit is not perfect, but it doesn’t deserve much criticism either. You can feel the ambition to make an outstanding design, but you can also find engineering solutions that show some lack of experience or simply went wrong.
    Like many modellers today I use super thin cement, in this case the one from Gunze that I find even more pleasant than the one from Tamiya. Joining the fuselage halfs, I forced them in the desired position with the help of a dozen of clamps, tweezers and rubber bands. A number of strokes of the brush to follow and that’s it. The fuselage halfs are thinker than usual in this kit leading to a stiff structure and a will of their own regarding aligning to each other. Nothing to worry about but the joints certainly require some filling. Rescribing of lost panel lines is therefore mandatory.
    The only major fit issue of the air frame is the wing root joint. Both sides’ upper wing halfs miss 0,25 mm to fit to the fuselage – constantly over the whole length of the joint, if you properly align the edges and outer joints. You may of course compromise here to narrow the gap there, but it remains a problem. I know from iModeler fellows that they used liquid filler here, but I wanted to avoid sanding at the wing roots after assembly to not to ruine the nice surface detail and I wanted a strong joint to resist robust handling of the model later on.
    Evergreen plastic card (0,25 mm), glued to the wing and carefully sanded, solved the problem.

    11 attached images. Click to enlarge.

  • Bryan W. Bernart said 4 years, 1 month ago:

    Halvar,
    I’ve had this kit for a while and always found an excuse not to build it. I will follow your build with interest, although I’m going to forego the aftermarket bits, but think I have an Eduard cockpit p/e set.
    Looks great so far.

Viewing 1 - 15 of 27 posts