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Glencoe 1/48 USCG 36 Foot Motor lifeboat

July 15, 2015 in Ships

shortly after starting added gray primer coat also deck and cabins

3 additional images. Click to enlarge

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4 responses to Glencoe 1/48 USCG 36 Foot Motor lifeboat

  1. Interesting looking project, Joe.

    Just as a heads-up if you’re planning a photo essay of the build, that is to say, Work in Progress, you may want to consider posting the progress shots and narrative under The Armada in Groups.

    I’ve not heard of this lifeboat before. How was it powered – engine or oars?

    Cheers for posting.

    • Hey Rob
      In answer to your question regarding the lifeboat’s power the design was derived from the 34′ RNLI LIVERPOOL model lifeboat, powered by oars and sail. Our British cousins gave us Yanks a Liverpool boat for evaluation in 1879. The boat was perfect for the American Great Lakes region but too large for our small coastal American lifesaving crews (7-9 men as opposed to 15 men in England.) But some inventive soul in Michigan took the Liverpool boat and put a 2 cylinder gas engine in the aft compartment in 1899 and the 36′ MLB was born. The Glencoe model represents the type TRS model lifeboat powered by a 4-cyl Buda gas engine. Many of the USCG lifeboats (200 or so) were converted to 6-cyl diesels after WWII. These 36′ were replaced by the USCG 44′ steel hull MLB starting in 1961. And, as a gesture of international friendship, the Yanks gave the Brits a 44′ MLB for evaluation for the RNLI. The RNLI built 24 of these boats and were known as the WAVENEY class boat. Hope I wasn’t too long winded in reply!
      Not to hijack anyones topic but I posted my build of these
      Glencoe 36′ Motor lifeboats about two years ago showing the boats heritege from start to finish.

    • Ok I’ll switch it over to Armada

  2. What an unusual choice of subject,looking forward to seeing it finished.

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