Profile Photo

  • 13 articles
  • 1,632 karma
  • 12 friends

Aircraft Museum in Berlin-part 2 – indoor

This article is part of a series:
  1. Aircraft Museum in Berlin-part 1 – outdoor
  2. Aircraft Museum in Berlin-part 2 – indoor

These pictures should not be so dark as the outdoor ones; we had rainy weather that day – sorry

21 additional images. Click to enlarge.


23 responses to Aircraft Museum in Berlin-part 2 – indoor

  1. Great pics. What I fail to understand is the functional ban by many model manufacturers on including swastika decals with their kits. My forefathers fought the Nazis and I couldn’t be happier that the swastika as the Nazis used it has been relegated to the dustbin of history. But it is, in fact, history. This museum in Berlin rightly displays aircraft with the swastika, because such is the historical record. Why can’t manufacturers leave it to the builders on how accurate their builds will be, and not force them into another aftermarket purchase of decals?

    • David @davidathomas, as this question pops up quite frequently on anglo-american forums, let me try to explain what is going on with the swastika in German-speaking countries like Germany or Austria (where I happen to live):
      Basically there is a ban on the display of symbols of totalitarian regimes *without proper context*. Now the context part is key here. You are allowed to display swastikas, SS-runes etc. in a museum, for educational purposes, or as part of a piece of art, although the art thing can get a bit tricky. You are *not* allowed to display them on toys. No one would be too happy seeing a Barbie doll with boots and a swastika T-Shirt, right?
      Scale model kits are by legal definition toys, not a means of education or art-in-a-box. So legaly there is no difference between Tamiya’s Bf 109 G-6 and said Barbie doll. And as the large European manufacturers like Revell of Germany or Airfix sell their kits in toy stores, they simply cannot run the risk.
      I for one are pretty happy with this situation, as I wouldn’t want to see swastikas in the toys isle of a department store.

      • Boris, I fully understand your point. “Toys” and “art” are indeed tricky categories. Naturally, from my point of reference, I am building a model as an historical art form–not a toy. But once things enter a legal forum, that becomes much more difficult to ensure.

        And yes, Barbie in Jack boots doing the Heil is a frightening idea indeed.

      • Thank you, Boris, for your profound explanation! By the way: I am German living in Austria, too and I realize a little difference meanwhile: Germany gets more relaxed concerning that topic while Austria is still much more “tensed” in that matter.

    • Thank you, David, for your comment. Concerning that swastika topic: I thanked Boris for his comprehensible explanation already. I think being more relaxed on that topic would help on one hand, but on the other hand I understand being cautious even after more than 70 years…..

  2. Excellent set of photos. Stunning!!! Is the rudder that of Joachim Marseilles Me 109? Is the concrete structure a remnant from the Fuhrer bunker? The Heinkel He 111 and Me 163 Komet are my favorites!

  3. Good stuff…thanks again.

  4. Nice collection, I like that Tornado.

  5. Thanks for these.

  6. Thank you michael for the interessting pics! I love the fw 190!! Your model V1 looks quite better than this one!! 🙂

  7. Again great to see your pictures. The Focke Wulf and Gannet in German Navy colours are certainly my favorites.

  8. Really nice pics Michael, thanks for sharing.

  9. These are some wonderful photos !!!! If I had a favorite to pick it would come from the Gnome Rhone / Oberussel rotary, or any of the He-111, the Me-163 or the FW-190 pictures………………. Having access to the original rudder from one of Marseille’s Bf-109 planes or anything from the “Great War” is also very special.

    Thanks for taking the time to post these for our enjoyment.
    “liked”

Leave a Reply