iModeler

Elevate your modeling today.
Whatever scale modeling means for you,
iModeler brings all the pieces you need and people together
so you can easily share, show and learn.

Goblin Lord

July 21, 2015 in Figures

This sculpt, marketed as “Savage Horn” by Spanish company Nocturna, consists of twelve finely cast pieces of grey resin.

There’s little flash in evidence, but as some pieces are quite small a fine-toothed saw is required to remove them from their casting blocks. The pieces are presented in a sturdy metal tin, sandwiched between foam layers.

The scale is 54mm for the base figure, but the fact that the figure is mounted creates the impression of a larger scale. The kit base is just an irregular blob of resin, but looks fine with undergrowth/plant debris added. I’ve photographed it here against black granite, but have added a final photo with it on a yew plinth, its exhibition presentation. A display name plaque will be added to the plinth face in due course. Also, in the final photo, the figure has had a light application of Dullcote as per comments below, to reduce the sheen.

I had it in mind to title this, “Zotle Greasyshiv – Goblin Lord”, using the prescribed nomenclature for goblin names (Yes, there is one…), but for now I’ve simplified it as per Headlines.

Paints used are primarily Vallejo Model Color, Andrea Inks, and artists’ oil paints. Grass, lichen, leaves, and sands are from stock.

14 additional images. Click to enlarge

People who liked this article:
Profile photo of Erich GoldbachErich GoldbachProfile photo of DE4EVERDE4EVERGuestProfile photo of Simon WhitneySimon Whitney

25 responses to Goblin Lord

  1. An area of “modeling” I’ve never ventured into – nor do I expect to. I suppose I’m too old to break with “tradition” when it comes to modeling subjects. Your build certainly is eye-catching, however. 🙂

    • Thanks, Craig. I know most modellers are quite conservative in respect of preferred subjects, but I tend to just ‘model’ irrespectively, as I like the variety and challenges.

      As for ‘eye-catching’ even though the colours look crazy, I used a colour wheel to get primary colours, plus triads and split compliments, so the palette works ‘behind the scenes’ without actually clashing with the finishes.

  2. As Craig said above, fine work Rob, I have problems paint crew let alone a stand out figure.
    Well done mate.

  3. that looks cool man. lots of intricate detail!

  4. Excellent work, Rob. Not within my realm of interest, but I can appreciate great modelling regardless. It’s a pity the photos don’t convey how small that must be; 54mm is about 1/32 scale isn’t it? Amazing paintwork/detail, especially considering the scale.

  5. I’m not a figure guy, but this does present a pallet to show off some amazing paint artistry! Shading subtleties, overall color selection, etc. are very nice and rich.

  6. Greetings :
    That is one interesting specimen Rob. It is very much welcomed, thank you.
    Figure modeling, in my personnel opinion, is a very great way to kind of break away from the norm. It offers one the opportunity to let loose the imagination, and creativity among other factors. It makes one seek other skill’s and these in turn can then be used in what is the norm for that individual.
    I was working on a figure before all this moving into a new home occurred.
    I was taking some pictures hoping to post my first WIP ever, but that kind of blew away for awhile ( at least ). If you are interested I can send some to you later, I am busy know putting in what I hope can be the final touches too my room.

  7. Greetings :
    That is one interesting specimen Rob. It is very much welcomed, thank you.
    Figure modeling, in my personnel opinion, is a very great way to kind of break away from the norm. It offers one the opportunity to let loose the imagination, and creativity among other factors. It makes one seek other skill’s and these in turn can then be used in what is the norm for that individual.
    I was working on a figure before all this moving into a new home occurred.
    I was taking some pictures hoping to post my first WIP ever, but that kind of blew away for awhile ( at least ). If you are interested I can send some to you later, I am busy know putting in what I hope can be the final touches too my room.

  8. Quite a contrast to your last posting, Rob, but I suppose some of the skills are the same. Whatever, it’s certainly colourful, and has attracted a lot of interest already.

    • Yes I had my eye on this for a while as a change of pace project, but had to bring it forward as the manufacturer themselves only had a few remaining in stock. After that, gone for good, as they only cast x-number from each mould.

  9. Beautiful work, really! I only make figures for dioramas and I personally never dared to make a real figure but always liked these works of art.

  10. I cant see a goblin riding a stag tho, too unnatural 🙂
    Good job on it, but i would do a dull coat on it myself

    • Naturally, the use of the elk stag is a choice of the sculptor, but as it’s been a highly popular figure (I think now sold out), it strikes a chord with many people.

      As I mentioned earlier, since the photos here I have given the figure a dusting of Dullcote to tone it down and the sheen isn’t so prominent now. I think the macro lens amplified the effect anyway; it was never glossy.

      Thanks for the comment.

  11. Nice brush work, and application. Do you normally pick your own colors or is there a “guide” to assist the figure builder as to the final appearence?

    • Thanks, Mike. There’s no guide in the way that a plastic model has suggested specific colours/camo listed within the instructions. In fact there are no instructions. The ‘box art’ has a representative version as a suggested palette but that’s all it is, and the cover sample also serves as a guide to positions of pieces (usually only a few). It’s up to an individual to decide the scheme to bring out the best in the sculpt. As I mentioned earlier, I used a colour wheel to drive the colour combinations. I had bought a couple of odd shades of Games Color green and purple, and used them as the base for the figure. The elk has a more natural appearance and hide and mane colours were accordingly more naturalistic in appearance, followed by various highlights and lowlights.

      When I get the yew plinth in the next few days I may add a couple of new presentation photos, and also to show the differences after Dullcote application, as mentioned earlier.

      I think even if Figures, or more specifically Fantasy Figures, are not your interest, the detail of the sculpt can still be admired, the painting skills on offer notwithstanding!

      I don’t consider myself a figure painter, but I find it makes a nice change to kit models, and there is a remarkable variety of figures available, whether historical, fantasy, or mythological, as examples, and in scales ranging from 28mm ‘wargaming sizes’ to 200mm historical busts. In the end, it’s all still modelling.

  12. Nice one Rob, Great painting, I’ll just stick to Aircraft for now.

Leave a reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.