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USAF Fighter Pilot, WWII, 120mm Verlinden figure

Ok, here go those Verkinden figures I did some 30-35 years ago or so.

I don’t have an acrylic protection for them so for all these years they have been collecting dust on shelves, moving from place to place a few times… Glad they are still mainly intact and no major damage suffered.

So from time to time I have already on occasion cleaned them, but as the time goes by they tend to loose part of the initial shiny colors.
One way to try to restore these colors, at least partially, is (at least that’s the method I’ve used so far, until I find a better way; any tips, please don’t hesitate!) carefully cleaning them using some car wax/polish. Obviously it must be as neutral, non abrasive and non aggressive as possible.

The one I used a few times in the past, I don’t have it anymore, and I have no idea what it was. So recently I found another one I have and have used this one this time.
Apparently this one is somehow more aggressive than the one I previously used. You’ll notice that especially with the 1st figure below, some of the paint (mainly on his pants, so I guess it has to do with the fact they are on a clear color, Khaki if not mistaken) is kind of gone. I’ll have to fix it later, by probably repainting the pants, as for Bobs advice (thank you Bob πŸ˜‰ ) .

Starting with a 120mm USAF Fighter Pilot, WWII: (ref: 487) :

Critics welcome.

Cheers!

Dolf


20 responses to USAF Fighter Pilot, WWII, 120mm Verlinden figure

  1. Looks good – some subtle shading and highlighting.

    • Hi Greg! @gkittinger

      Thanks!

      I will definitely have to fix this one later. This last cleaning damaged some of the painting on his pants πŸ™

      Cheers!

      Dolf

      Edit: btw, I saw some of your 1/72 aircraft! Beautiful pieces!
      And the idea of making them all wheels up reminds me of a metal collection I have, some 50 WWII warcraft from all nations involved in that war, as some of them are also wheels up!

  2. beautiful job!!!

    • Hi Paul! @jjetmec

      Thank you!

      Sadly this one, as I say, is the one that definitely needs some painting repair on his pants!

      IMO the other ones I’ve been posting look better than this one πŸ˜‰

      Cheers!

      Dolf

      PS: Teixeira is a Portuguese name. I see on your presentation you’re from Rhode Island, where I believe there’s a significant Portuguese community.
      I’m Portuguese btw, hence mentioning this πŸ™‚

  3. that is outstanding…you sure capture the sublime…love your work

    • Hi Bob! @p38j

      Coming from you I take it as a real compliment, thank you!
      You’re the best figure modeller I’m aware of on this Forum!

      Anyway, check the others I’ve been posting, IMO they are all better than this one (and in better shape after the cleaning!) .

      Cheers!

      Dolf

  4. Looking good, even if he looks a bit off balance (stance wise).

    • Peter, @tecko

      He!He!He!… You’re right indeed. I’ve always noticed that. But that’s how he came from the manufacturer.

      I guess the only way to balance him right would be using a different base as the one I used (I tried to reproduce the look of the asphalt on some air base) .
      If I had made a different base (on dirt, or grass, as for the Memphis Belle crewman for instance) I could have at least partially hide that natural off-balance of him, by sinking a bit his left boot.

      Cheers!

      Dolf

  5. Maybe he’s hung over? Great work!

  6. Good way to clean the dust without rubbing: get two pump-action spray bottles, clean them out. Fill both with tap water. Drizzle some dish soap into one (do not make it foam!), then spray the one with the dish soap, which loosens the dust and such. Then rinse thoroughly with the other one, and allow to air dry. Apply a coat of some satin-finish clear varnish over. Paint will be restored and you will be able to clean in future (using the spray bottles)

    HTH

    • Tom, @tcinla

      Bob Mack also suggested cleaning them with water, but on his case he apparently does it under the tap, using cold water and just a drop or so of Dawn detergent on the figure, then rinse out the detergent with more cold water under the tap.

      I might try that in the future, with two pump-action spray bottles as you say.

      Obviously for figures like my Memphis Belle crewman, who has a paper map on his hand, I’d have to remove it first πŸ™‚

      Some modellers immediately apply a varnish coat over these (and other scales) figures after painting them, even before weathering (Verlinden, if not mistaken used that method) .
      I don’t remember if I did it, probably not, or at least not on all my figures (this one definitely not) .
      But applying a coat of some satin-finish clear varnish over the figure once it’s clean, is definitely an excellent idea!

      Thanks a lot for the tips!

      Cheers!

      Dolf

  7. Good tip. I’ll take that one on board. Thanks.

  8. Nicely done, sir.

  9. Ok, this guy has had his pants restored.

    Also took the opportunity to restore his cap and a few other details.

    Started with a coat of Humbrol Khaki Drill, then a coat of Humbrol Matt Varnish, and finally a very diluted coat of a mix of just a tiny drop of the Khaki Drill mixed with Raw Umber oil paint, for the weathering effects, and darken the folds.

    I notice that often figures from a lot of modelers nowadays, using mainly acrylic paints, have a too shinny look, which IMHO doesn’t look that much realistic.
    Amazingly, even if I applied a coat of Matt Varnish over the Khaki Drill, I still find it a bit too shinny, even after applying some very diluted oil paint.
    I might apply another coat of this Raw Umber, so maybe this IMHO unrealistic too shinny look will go away.

    Anyway, here are the new pics of his restored pants:

    These pics were taken outside, with natural Sun light:

    This last pic was taken inside, with artificial light:

    Cheers!

    Dolf

  10. ‘Dolf, @dolfdylan The trousers may look too shiny, but the shine on the leather is perfect! Your pilot looks great and his expression says he just finished another successful mission without injury or problem.

    Well done, my Portuguese friend. Even done 30 years ago, the quality shines through!

  11. Jeff (@mikegolf)

    Thanks a lot!

    Yes, this fixing of his trousers/pants didn’t work right.

    I’ll find a way to fix it one of these days.

    I love the jacket tho πŸ˜‰

    Cheers!

    Dolf

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