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On This Day…October 14th

The photo below is of the USS Langley (CVL27) taken just off Taiwan on October 14th, 1944. The flight deck crew are seen taking cover from a Japanese aircraft (dead centre of the photo).

The Langley served in the French Navy as ‘La Fayette’ after the war as part of the Mutual Defense Assistance Program in 1951.

Also taken on October 14th, was the photo below of WAVES personnel undergoing training in the Low Pressure Chamber at the Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida.

On October 14th, 1944, a 101 Squadron Lancaster drops a ‘cookie’ bomb and incendiary bombs over Duisburg, Germany during Operation Hurricane.


16 responses to On This Day…October 14th

  1. Nice selection David. The first 2 are new to me

  2. Pedro, I just think that moment when those guys see the Japanese plane turning to make an approach captures that moment between life and death, where someone sees the possibility of the end. And those men faced that every day.

    @holzhamer

  3. George S Patton;

    “It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather, we should thank God that such men lived”.

  4. Interesting set of pics….thanks.

  5. David, I really like this new “series” you’ve started! It’s fitting tribute to those men and women who served their countries. I’m proud to say that my Father, Mother and my Step-Dad all served in WWII. Dad was a Navy fighter, dive-bomber and torpedo bomber pilot, Mother trained “pilots-in-training” on the Link trainer as well as navigation classes, and my Step-Dad was a Mortar Platoon leader who set up the 1st Observation Post (OP) on the German side of the Rhein River after crossing the Ludendorf bridge – otherwise known as the Bridge at Remagen.

    These and ALL the other TRUE heroes shall never be forgotten, at least as long as I’m alive! Obviously – you too! Excellent topic, Doc David!

  6. Jeff, I am of the mind that no-one truly dies who lives in our memories. I think it’s why many of us love this hobby – it connects us with a different set of values, of exceptional people and their lives and sacrifices.

  7. Thanks for taking the time to research and post these David!

  8. Thanks for the feedback, Michel. Specific days in history somehow ‘feel’ important an connect us with the past. You’ll like this one; did you know that today was the very day that King Harold was defeated by William the Conqueror (and killed) in the battle of Hastings in 1066? The very last Anglo Saxon king of England.

    Sadly, no-one was around to take a photo, but someone made a nice tapestry…

  9. Wasn’t there a movie about that, I remember seeing the tapestry in either the opening or closing credits.

  10. David, @dirtylittlefokker you wrote: “Jeff, I am of the mind that no-one truly dies who lives in our memories. I think it’s why many of us love this hobby – it connects us with a different set of values, of exceptional people and their lives and sacrifices.”

    I never looked at it quite THAT way before, but I believe you’re right.

    Isn’t that tapestry the one from the Battle of Hastings? Robert @roofrat I don’t remember the movie, but I visited the actual battleground near the East Sussex (district) town of Pevensey, England. The town of Battle was founded on part of the actual battleground some years after the battle was over. That’s all down in Southeast England, not far from where Paul Nash @white4freak lives, which is near Eastbourne {which is where I met my wife}.

  11. Thanks for that marvellous post, Jeff. Yes, that was the battle of Hastings (yesterday) where old Harold took one in the eye.

    Didn’t realise Paul was down this neck of the woods.

  12. Interesting group, David.

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