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Czech Models 1/48 T-34C Turbo Mentor

Thought I would post something a little different that you dont see posted very often. It is the limited-run Czech Models 1/48 T-34 Primary Navy Trainer. The Turbo-Prop version of the venerable Beechcraft T-34A and B models. The T-34C was used for many years, up until recently, when it was replaced by the T-6 Texan II as a primary training aircraft. If you were a Naval Aviator Candidate in the late 70’s, as well as the 80’s through early millennium you most definitely learned to fly navy style in this rugged, agile, bird. This was the 1st Naval aircraft you were allowed to touch. I actually logged many hours in this plane prior to being “medically discharged” from the Naval Aviator flight training program. So it holds a special place in my heart as the last and only Naval aircraft I was lucky enough to fly and solo in.

Unfortunately the model companies ignored this aircraft until the limited run company Czech Models produced it in 1/48 consisting of plastic and lots of resin details. The older T-34A was modeled in 1/72 a few times by Minicraft but never the Turbo Mentor.

Being a limited-run production it was not the most easiest kit to assemble and finish. Plastic parts had rough surface details and mediocre fit. The resin details were nice but require some work to incorporate. You also need to fabricate a few parts and details. Unfortunately it is not my best work and does not really hold up to my more recent builds. At the time I just sort of rushed it due to some level of frustration and lack of experience with this sort of kit. Also, at the time I did not take a lot of pictures of my models so these few shots are all I have; sorry for the poor quality. I would really love to see a 1/32 of this model and another opportunity to get it right!

5 additional images. Click to enlarge.


14 responses to Czech Models 1/48 T-34C Turbo Mentor

  1. Very nice job, Paul….and what DO you have that setting on/in…? 🙂

  2. Great build Paul! I was just reviewing my dad’s pilot logs, and when I was reminded of his time in the A-model during pilot training, thought I may need to secure another of the old Hasegawa kits to build up. Although the navy version has more visual interest – too bad those AF scheme developers had so little creativity when it came to their training aircraft!

    • Yea, always liked the Navy Trainer look. I actually logged about an hour in the T-34A prior to my time in the service. Navy/USMC recruiters who were pilots would fly around giving potential pilot candidates a taste of Navy style aerobatics. It was very colorful in blue and gold. Nice scheme to model. Forgot Hasegawa made one in 1/72 along with the Minicraft version in 1/72.

  3. Brave pilot, did well to land in that depth of snow…

    Thanks for posting this, Paul.

  4. Great work Paul! Those short run kits are usualy the source for the more unfamiliair types. With the combination of white and red it’s certainly not the easiest paint job, but it looks fantastic. Nice personal story which comes with your model, thanks for sharing .

  5. Nice to see something a little out of the ordinary, Paul, I love that colour scheme.

  6. Nice work!
    I was stationed at both Whiting and NAS Pensacola in the early 2000s, these were everywhere!
    I have one in the stash…I wonder if I could graft the turbo front end onto the 1/48 T-34A/B that is “supposed” to come out this year??? Although, I believe the empennage is different between them as well.

    • Yes, that sounds so similar to my Cape Cod Experiences. When not with CAP lived in RI and had a summer cottage in Falmouth and Dennis Port. Everyday at the beach would see them come and go. Later in life I was in service with my friends and we would do drills on Edwards base, steel a mutt from motor pool and drive over to the 101st complex and just hang out. What did u do with the P-3s in the Navy? Do u have any nice P-3 models to show?

  7. Hello Paul,
    Very attractive model. I noticed that the prop is in the right position.
    In Dutch this is called “vaanstand”
    Regards, Dirk

  8. Very nice finish

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