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Takom 1/35 Canadian C2 Leopard Mexas

This article is part of a series:
  1. 1/35th Leopard Line Up
  2. Leopard 1A5 Bundeswehr
  3. Weathering, the Belgian Leopard Conversion Continues
  4. Leopard AS1 Aus Cam Update
  5. Leopard AS 1 Olive Drab Lusterless Update
  6. Dutch Leopard 1
  7. Australian Leopard AS1 Dozer
  8. Danish Leopard 1A5DK
  9. Takom 1/35 Canadian C2 Leopard Mexas
  10. Australian Trials Leopard Tank
  11. Australian Leopard AS1 with drivers and engine compartments.
  12. Leopard AS1 Engine, Engine Bay and Drivers Compartment Latest Progress
  13. Unfinished Business – Finishing Off the Belgian Leopard
  14. Trying New Techniques On Tamiya Leopard A3/A4
  15. Revell Leopard 1 A1A4 Weathering And Camnet
  16. Leopard 1 A1A1 With Peddinghaus Turret
  17. 1/35 Camouflage Nets
  18. Camnet Construction continued...

This is the kit of the C2 Mexas. I've heard some not too complimentary things about the turret of the Takom kit. As I'm doing another () C2 but with the thermal cover to the turret and driving area, I decided to "donate" the unused turret from the Meng to this one. That in itself was a "fun" story...
There are also some and update parts. The basics are done, so I'm now working on the stowage as you can see...

4 additional images. Click to enlarge.


4 responses

  1. Great subject, spectacular weathering, Ian!

  2. Nice work, Ian. Lots of careful detail work put into getting this one right. The weathering is effective. I like the bootprint effect others have mentioned. I don't think I've seen that done before. You seem to be a MiG finishings user. Do you use the MiG non-slip surfacing on your vehicles? I got it for the Merkavas in my stash but haven't had the gumption to use it yet.

    • Hi Colin, please for give such a late reply to your post.

      Thank you for your compliments. As you said, I do use Mig pigments for finishes, but I also use different techniques or mediums for the effects I want. For example, I've found that the Humbrol dust effect when carefully airbrushed can give a fantastic effect provided you modulate by going from light dust to heavy dust by the running gear. Sand, mixed with fine plaster of Paris, a suitable coloured paint, all mixed in with white (PVA) glue can give a fantastic heavy mud effect. I use this as it helps to economise on the use of Mig pigments which can be used elsewhere.

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